A STROLL THROUGH HERRON-MORTON

December was a hot mess. Sunsets at 5:30. Near 70-degree temperatures. January was no less confusing. A practically balmy spring day, shortly followed by a 40-degree drop and four days of flurries. Thunderstorms--wider than the state, even--dumped upon us heavy rains and strong winds. Vivid, pink sunsets. Crunching snow. Green grass. Brisk air. Light breeze. The weather cannot make up its mind. Regardless, on one of those warmer days (and just before a rainstorm), I took a walk around my neighborhood, Herron-Morton Place.

In the early days of the Civil War, my neighborhood was called "Camp Morton" (after Indiana Governor Oliver P. Morton) and was used initially as a training and induction center. However, Camp Morton later served as a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp, and some of the soldiers were buried at Crown Hill Cemetery (which I've heard is quite beautiful, actually; I have yet to visit). After the Civil War, this land was used for the Indiana State Fair. But, in 1891, the fairgrounds were purchased by three businessmen, divided into residential polots, and renamed "Morton Place." Then, in 1902, the John Herron Art Institute, designed by Vonnegut & Bohn (the former of which was Kurt Vonnegut, Sr., the famed author's father), was established.

During the mid-1900s, many of the homes fell to disrepair, even though the intial residents of Herron-Morton had been well-known in Indianapolis. In 1938, however, Herron-Morton Place was included on the National Register of Historic Places. To this day, there are still some homes that are in need of repairs and rehabilitation. There are still a few empty lots from those that were demolished 50 or so years ago. But there is also character. And history. And color.




























I apologize for the gloomy, gray photos; not my best. Regardless, I hope they you gives you an idea about the neighborhood in which I live. I hope to go out again when it is warmer and take even more photos of the little details, the beautiful architecture. And the colors. Oh, the colors: teal, pink, royal purple...

16 comments:

  1. Wow, there is so much character in all these pictures. I would love to live in a neighbourhood like this.

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  2. I am smitten with the colors of these buildings in your neighborhood. Even if they are old, they look like they were cared for and kept up.

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  3. I love hearing history about where people live because you never know what didn't get into the history books BUT maybe the coolest thing ever! These homes have so much character!!! I love the yellow one!! =)

    Ergo - Blog

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  4. Wow! What amazing history and the buildings are absolutely beautiful! I love that architecture!

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  5. I have fallen in love with your neighborhood. It's very different from mine, which is basically the classic 1970's suburb where every house looks the same. I need that yellow house with the little round turret.

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  6. Your neighbourhood looks amazing!

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  7. These pictures are sooo deep and atmospheric! And I think the cloudy day and the diffused light only adds to this. I'm especially fascinated by the first picture... wow, what a scenery!

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  8. Wow. I love these photos! Your neighborhood it's very different from mine.
    Do you wanna follow each other? ;>
    http://nbyen.blogspot.com/

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  9. Stunning pics!

    Larissa
    http://jlcarrick.blogspot.com/

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  10. what beautiful houses!!! I love taking a walk with you ;)

    and thank-you for the history lesson Dawn :)

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  11. I absolutely love these pictures! The homes are so much fun, with so much character!
    xo TJ

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  12. Love the colored shingles and siding - happy houses. :)

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  13. My heart skipped a beat when I saw this post in my feed. THANK YOU THANK YOU. Okay, that first picture of the green house. Wow, just wow. It's gorgeous. The shingles on that one house and all of the details. Wow, such lovely homes. I could stare at houses like this all day. That cemetery sounds like it would be fun to explore too. I love hearing the connecting history behind your state/town.

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  14. So beautiful doll! I love these photos! Also as a Historian I love that you added that history aspect to this post! And just so you know from my blog: Yes that was IUPUI and I love that we both took a photo of that rose! It was so beautiful and odd to see such a delicate rose still in bloom while everything was was dying.

    Chao
    Poppie
    http://thepoppie.com

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